Tag Archives: Lamb: The Gospel According to Biff

WWW Wednesdays – October 24, 2012

WWW Wednesdays

My bookshelf

The Conflict : How Modern Motherhood Undermines The Status Of Women by Elisabeth Badinter– What I’m currently reading
The Conflict : How Modern Motherhood Undermines The Status Of Women by Elisabeth Badinter. I’m half-way through and I have probably rolled my eyes a dozen times so far.

– What I recently finished reading
Lamb: The Gospel According to Biff, Christ’s Childhood Pal by Christopher Moore. The bad part about this book? It’s 100 pages too long and it lost me in many details about the era it describes. I didn’t want to read a book about religion or history and I was mostly looking for entertainment. And that’s the good part about this book. It’s very entertaining, very funny, hilarious at times. Biff is great as Joshua’s sidekick, as he experiences the good, the bad and the ugly and discovers his gifts. If you get bored with some of the descriptions, just skip to the good parts, which is mostly the dialogs. It’s a well worth read just for them.

– What I think I’ll read next
Make the Bread, Buy the Butter by Jennifer Reese. I first heard about this book on Sofacents’ blog. It tells you how to save time and money by buying some food items and making the others from scratch. I don’t have a lot of money and I don’t have a lot of time either, so this may be the book just for me.

My kids’ bookshelf

Roscoe Riley Rules #1: never glue your friends to chairs by Katherine ApplegateWhat they’re currently reading
Roscoe Riley Rules #1: Never Glue Your Friends to Chairs by Katherine Applegate.
I L-O-V-E this book! And here are a few reasons why:
– Roscoe is about 6 -7 years old and he speaks proper English, unlike Junie B. Jones, whose books are permanently banned at our house for this very reason.
– My six-year old read this book on his own in one sitting and liked it so much, he told me I should read it too. On my own. Not with him.
– I started reading it and I liked it so much, I thought it would be a pity for my four-year old not to hear this story, so I’m now reading it with him.
– I love the first person narration and how Roscoe Riley describes himself as an “everyday kid” who sometimes gets in trouble but really doesn’t mean to. I know lots of kids who can relate to him!
– You know you’re going to read an interesting book when Chapter 2 is titled “Something you should know before we get started” and it reads these few words:
“Here’s the thing about Super-Mega-Gonzo Glue.
When the label says permanent, they mean permanent.
As in FOREVER AND EVER.”

I can’t wait to finish this book and read the next ones in the series!

Axle Annie by Robin Pulver– What they recently finished reading
We’ve read two great books by Robin Pulver several times and they were a hit:
Axle Annie: The schools in Burskyville never close for a snow day because school bus driver Axle Annie is always able to make it up the steepest hill in town. That’s until Shifty Rhodes and Hale Snow set out to stop her. Axle Annie is my hero. I can’t drive a car in the snow, so forget about a school bus!
Axle Annie And The Speed Grump: always impatient and driving too fast without paying attention to the road, Rush Hotfoot learns his lesson when he ends up in a life threatening situation. Fortunately for him, school bus driver Axle Annie and the kids on the bus are there to rescue him, because it’s the right thing to do. My kids actually wanted Rush Hotfoot not to be saved because he’s mean, so this was a good lesson of character or them.

– What I think they’ll read next
I don’t know but I’m sure it will be good stuff. What about you? Any books you or your kids are reading you’d like to share?

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WWW Wednesdays – October 10, 2012

WWW Wednesdays

Sorry for the one-day late update. I wanted to finish my book so I could write a review of it after making sure I knew how it would end.

My bookshelf

Lamb: The Gospel According to Biff, Christ's Childhood Pal by Christopher Moore– What I’m currently reading
Tonight I’ll be starting Lamb: The Gospel According to Biff, Christ’s Childhood Pal by Christopher Moore. I could use a funny book right now so I can’t wait. Unfortunately I noticed the font size is again ridiculously small, but I’m ready with my magnifier!

– What I recently finished reading
The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot. A few of you warned me the beginning of the book was better than the end and you were right. The first half was great and it went downhill from there. I flipped through the last hundred pages because it became too tedious to read every single word. This is quite an amazing story and I’m very glad someone took the time to tell it to the world. This really makes you think about how much science and medicine can progress when given the right human samples, and the ethics involved in the process. The scariest part I read? Apparently it is perfectly legal for any medical institution to do whatever they want with your discarded body parts/tissues, for example after surgery. Unless they plan to make money with them (you’d have to sign a form, and I’m sure this happens ALL the time…), they can use your tissue samples for the advance of science and medicine without your knowledge or consent. The courts see your removed body parts as something you don’t want or need anymore, and they don’t belong to you once they are out. Who knew you’d have to do the same as with mechanics, and ask for your used parts after the procedure?! I found this fact quite shocking, don’t you?

– What I think I’ll read next
The Conflict : How Modern Motherhood Undermines The Status Of Women by Elisabeth Badinter. Carrie at The Write Transition told me I should read it so here I go! I can’t wait to read what a billionaire French compatriot can teach me about motherhood, and how trying to be a great mom undermines my position in society. Yep, if it was only motherhood that undermined women in society…

My kids’ bookshelf

17 kings and 42 elephants by margaret mahyWhat they’re currently reading
I’d like to share three books by Margaret Mahy we’ve been reading:
Down The Back Of The Chair. Dad loses his car keys (ah, men!) so he can’t go to work, which means he can’t get paid. His daughter suggests to look down the back of the chair, where page by page they discover quite a lot of… things. My kids love the effect of surprise every time something else comes out of the chair.
A Busy Day For A Good Grandmother. Mrs Oberon comes to her son’s rescue when he runs out of cock-a-hoop-honey-cake, the only thing that will help her grandson with his teething problems. But she faces quite a few life-threatening obstacles to get there. This book includes a plane ride, a bike ride, a raft ride, and more. I get tired just reading it!
17 kings and 42 elephants. This story doesn’t make much sense but you read it for the ridiculous lines (a delight for anyone appreciating the English language) and the beautiful illustrations, which are silk paintings.

Emily Brown and the thing by Cressida Cowell

Emily Brown and the thing by Cressida Cowell

– What I recently finished reading
Emily Brown And The Thing and That Rabbit Belongs To Emily Brown by Cressida Cowell. We have the French version of Emily Brown And The Thing, a hilarious story about a “thing” who can’t get to sleep and keeps Emily Brown up because he’s worrried about “things”. So we started reading it again after I borrowed That Rabbit Belongs To Emily Brown. In it, the queen keeps asking Emily for Stanley, her stuffed bunny, because he looks loved (read, well used). After Emily refuses her many requests, the queen sends a special team to rabbitnap Stanley at night, which really ticks off Emily. We love the funny, happy ending.

– What I think they’ll read next
I don’t know but I’m sure it will be good stuff. What about you? Any books you or your kids are reading you’d like to share?

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WWW Wednesdays – October 3, 2012

WWW Wednesdays

Argh, sorry for the previous messed-up post! Alright, let’s start this again. You’ll see I have my reasons to be messed up…

This is going to be a condensed version of my weekly update because my DSL connection has been slowing dying for the past week and I have very limited access to the internet from my computer. I’m working on a replacement solution so in the meantime, I focus most of my internet access on work projects and get to blogging whenever it fits.

My bookshelf

The immortal life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot– What I’m currently reading
The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot. I like it so far and I had no idea about HeLa cells, their origin and their importance for modern medecine, so this is a fascinating subject.

– What I recently finished reading
Dandelion Wine by Ray Bradbury. What a lovely book about summer for two brothers, detailing what happens in this small town of Illinois on a daily basis. I love the poetry Bradbury uses to describes every little scene, the humor, the sadness and the frightful moments. It’s a great book to remind you of your own childhood and how you used to spend your summers. I definitely recommend this read, especially anytime during the summer months.

– What I think I’ll read nex
Lamb: The Gospel According to Biff, Christ’s Childhood Pal by Christopher Moore. This is for my book club meeting at the end of this month and it looks absolutely hilarious.

My kids’ bookshelf
Mucky Moose by Jonathan AllenWhat they’re currently reading
Mucky Moose by Jonathan Allen. Mucky Moose is the biggest moose in the forest and the biggest wolf in the forest decides to eat him for dinner. Unfortunately the wolf doesn’t know Mucky Moose really, really stinks. So the wolf tries different things, like putting a clothespin on his nose, or wearing a gas mask. My kids LOVE this story and have asked for it almost every day for the past week.
Green Wilma and Green Wilma, Frog in Space by Tedd Arnold. We’re big fans of Tedd Arnold, especially his Fly Guy series and we recently discovered the Wilma books, which are not so recent. Poor Wilma is a normal girl who one days wakes up as a very green frog. This seems to bother everyone from her parents to her teacher but her, as she embraces her new life as an amphibian. Two very absurd, yet very funny stories.

– What I think they’ll read next
I don’t know but I’m sure it will be good stuff. What about you? Any books you or your kids are reading you’d like to share?

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