WWW Wednesdays – October 10, 2012

WWW Wednesdays

Sorry for the one-day late update. I wanted to finish my book so I could write a review of it after making sure I knew how it would end.

My bookshelf

Lamb: The Gospel According to Biff, Christ's Childhood Pal by Christopher Moore– What I’m currently reading
Tonight I’ll be starting Lamb: The Gospel According to Biff, Christ’s Childhood Pal by Christopher Moore. I could use a funny book right now so I can’t wait. Unfortunately I noticed the font size is again ridiculously small, but I’m ready with my magnifier!

– What I recently finished reading
The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot. A few of you warned me the beginning of the book was better than the end and you were right. The first half was great and it went downhill from there. I flipped through the last hundred pages because it became too tedious to read every single word. This is quite an amazing story and I’m very glad someone took the time to tell it to the world. This really makes you think about how much science and medicine can progress when given the right human samples, and the ethics involved in the process. The scariest part I read? Apparently it is perfectly legal for any medical institution to do whatever they want with your discarded body parts/tissues, for example after surgery. Unless they plan to make money with them (you’d have to sign a form, and I’m sure this happens ALL the time…), they can use your tissue samples for the advance of science and medicine without your knowledge or consent. The courts see your removed body parts as something you don’t want or need anymore, and they don’t belong to you once they are out. Who knew you’d have to do the same as with mechanics, and ask for your used parts after the procedure?! I found this fact quite shocking, don’t you?

– What I think I’ll read next
The Conflict : How Modern Motherhood Undermines The Status Of Women by Elisabeth Badinter. Carrie at The Write Transition told me I should read it so here I go! I can’t wait to read what a billionaire French compatriot can teach me about motherhood, and how trying to be a great mom undermines my position in society. Yep, if it was only motherhood that undermined women in society…

My kids’ bookshelf

17 kings and 42 elephants by margaret mahyWhat they’re currently reading
I’d like to share three books by Margaret Mahy we’ve been reading:
Down The Back Of The Chair. Dad loses his car keys (ah, men!) so he can’t go to work, which means he can’t get paid. His daughter suggests to look down the back of the chair, where page by page they discover quite a lot of… things. My kids love the effect of surprise every time something else comes out of the chair.
A Busy Day For A Good Grandmother. Mrs Oberon comes to her son’s rescue when he runs out of cock-a-hoop-honey-cake, the only thing that will help her grandson with his teething problems. But she faces quite a few life-threatening obstacles to get there. This book includes a plane ride, a bike ride, a raft ride, and more. I get tired just reading it!
17 kings and 42 elephants. This story doesn’t make much sense but you read it for the ridiculous lines (a delight for anyone appreciating the English language) and the beautiful illustrations, which are silk paintings.

Emily Brown and the thing by Cressida Cowell

Emily Brown and the thing by Cressida Cowell

– What I recently finished reading
Emily Brown And The Thing and That Rabbit Belongs To Emily Brown by Cressida Cowell. We have the French version of Emily Brown And The Thing, a hilarious story about a “thing” who can’t get to sleep and keeps Emily Brown up because he’s worrried about “things”. So we started reading it again after I borrowed That Rabbit Belongs To Emily Brown. In it, the queen keeps asking Emily for Stanley, her stuffed bunny, because he looks loved (read, well used). After Emily refuses her many requests, the queen sends a special team to rabbitnap Stanley at night, which really ticks off Emily. We love the funny, happy ending.

– What I think they’ll read next
I don’t know but I’m sure it will be good stuff. What about you? Any books you or your kids are reading you’d like to share?

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7 responses to “WWW Wednesdays – October 10, 2012

  1. I think the issue of discarded medical tissue needs to change given the new world of DNA knowledge. Maybe it already has–I’m not as knowledgeable on this topic as I probably should be. But I’m sure that book is an eye opener.

    I tried to read Lamb but couldn’t get into it. That probably doesn’t surprise you given my desire for the concrete. But I’m currently reading Gone Girl. So, so good.

    Thanks for the mention! And get yourself ready for that Badinter book. Your blood pressure will soar. :)

    • I think what we know and can do with DNA today is the scary part. I can’t believe the courts have repeatedly ruled against the privacy protection of discarded body tissues. When I was pregnant, I considered donating my umbilical cord to science. When I saw I had to complete 20 pages of paperwork, and then I wasn’t eligible because I had lived in Europe (I clearly could have mad cow disease after not eating beef for over 20 years…), I gave up. But now, I wonder what happened to the cord, the placenta and everything else that came out at birth… And it’s my kids’ DNA out there.

      Gosh, I hope I’ll like Lamb more than you! The small font is a killer though. As for my blood pressure, I don’t need it to get higher, so we’ll see…

  2. I just scanned a few of the reviews for The Conflict on Amazon. It sounds absolutely horrid. Make sure you wear your galoshes before wading into that mess! ;)

    • Haha, I have a feeling it will be a fast read. I wonder if it was received more positively in France, and I have a feeling it was. She’s got a strong following there and the feminist movement is alive and well.

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